Glaisdale and Whitby: a visit to the North York Moors

A weekend with friends in a cottage in the North York Moors National Park? Perfect! Glaisdale is a pretty village, built on a steep valley descending to the River Esk. Our cottage, Thorneywaites View, was the former cow byre of the farm at High Brock Rigg – at the top end of the village as the name suggests. Right down at the bottom near the river was the railway station, which we used to visit Whitby, and the pub, the Arncliffe Arms. We enjoyed a meal there one night – not enjoyed quite so much was the walk back home which was, of course, all uphill.

Crossing the river just beyond the pub and the station is the picturesque Beggar’s Bridge. Legend has it that the inscription on the bridge (1619 and the initials TF) refers to Thomas Ferries, the son of a moorland farmer. When he was courting he had to ford the Esk to meet his young lady, Agnes, whose father considered Thomas too poor for his daughter. Thomas resolved to seek his fortune at sea but, with the river in flood, was unable to cross to kiss his sweetheart goodbye. Returning later, a wealthy man, Thomas married Agnes and built a handsome bridge on the very spot so that other impecunious young lovers would not have the same problem. Maybe not entirely true, but a good photo opportunity. From there, we did a lovely circular walk via Glaisdale and Egton Bridge.

The cottage and its surroundings:

The walk – a perfect arrangement with a pub in the middle and a tearoom at the end:

It must be almost 30 years since I last visited Whitby. Because we took the train, and they weren’t very frequent, we only had a few hours there and spent most of the time at the 13th century abbey perched on its headland:

So, a fabulous weekend with good weather, good food and good company – including John, although that’s not apparent in the pictures because he took them all! Must try harder to include him next time.

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14 thoughts on “Glaisdale and Whitby: a visit to the North York Moors

    • Anabel Marsh May 10, 2014 / 08:34

      Thank you! I want to believe the story, but not entirely sure it’s genuine. Thanks also for exploring the blog so thoroughly.

      Like

    • Anabel Marsh May 8, 2014 / 07:23

      And whether true or just a legend it’s a lovely story.

      Like

  1. Calli May 7, 2014 / 20:07

    I love that abandoned abbey at the end – absolutely beautiful! Looks like you had great weather too, always a perk for a day out 🙂

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    • Anabel Marsh May 7, 2014 / 20:58

      Looks are deceptive! Although it was sunny, there was a bitter wind in that headland.

      Like

  2. johnmarkmiller May 6, 2014 / 21:16

    Love the romantic bridge and the little church in the countryside! Wow!

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    • Anabel Marsh May 6, 2014 / 21:50

      Thanks – it’s a very beautiful part of England that I don’t actually know that well any more, so I was glad to remake it’s acquaintance.

      Like

  3. Birgit May 6, 2014 / 19:59

    How Beautiful and love the story about the man building the bridge for a kiss. Wjo cares if it is true-it’s sweet. Such beautiful pictures and love the beggars bridge. You know my niece is in Scotland doing a 6 day walk (Trassachs) and then going to London for 2 days and then Edinborough. She is with her 2 best friends and my niece had all of it planned and she is texting her dad daily. She didn’t want to bring a camera to get side tracked by taking pictures! She is 18 going on silly what more can I say about that.

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    • Anabel Marsh May 6, 2014 / 20:20

      Thanks Birgit. I hope your niece has a good time and doesn’t regret not having a camera. The Trossachs are beautiful!

      Like

  4. cvail May 6, 2014 / 18:57

    Anabel, It looks wonderful. Just to spend a weekend away, hiking, enjoying the scenery. Sounds great!

    Like

    • Anabel Marsh May 6, 2014 / 19:41

      It was, and it’s always lovely to see friends who live in a different part if the country and catch up with each other.

      Like

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