Gallus Glasgow K: The Kelvin

Kelvin Bridge
Kelvin Bridge

Glasgow’s most famous river is the Clyde, but its second most important is the Kelvin which flows through the north-west of the city to its confluence with the Clyde at Yorkhill. Many areas of the city are called after it – Kelvinbridge, Kelvindale, Kelvingrove, Kelvinhall and Kelvinside, so you see the name all over.

The scientific unit of temperature, the Kelvin scale, takes its name from physicist William Thomson (1824–1907) who was named Lord Kelvin after the river which flowed past his university. His statue sits in Kelvingrove park at the foot of Glasgow University.

There’s a joke about the Kelvinside accent – that a crèche is a collision between two automobiles and sex is what the coal comes in. Want to hear an example? Head back to the 1980s with thespians Victor and Barry, the Kelvinside Men. And yes, that is a young Alan Cumming hamming it up. Pure gallus, wasn’t he?

Tomorrow, in L, I’ll tell you about Glasgow’s motto.

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35 thoughts on “Gallus Glasgow K: The Kelvin

  1. vannillarock April 13, 2015 / 14:26

    Back in phoenix and able to have a catch up with other bloggers. Really enjoying all your letters and thought of Baxter and parliamo Glasgow when you mentioned coal being delivered in sex. Brilliant!

    Like

  2. dmlsexton April 13, 2015 / 14:30

    The picture of the bridge at the top is so beautiful. I haven’t thought of the Kelvin scale in a very long time, college physics is coming to mind. Wonderful post.

    Like

    • Anabel Marsh April 13, 2015 / 14:51

      Thanks! One of my Facebook friends was surprised I hadn’t kept absolute zero for Z – I never thought of that. Though I think I have something better….

      Like

  3. Nadine April 13, 2015 / 15:02

    Great pics! I also never thought about where the name for the Kelvin scale originated.

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  4. KaTy Did April 13, 2015 / 17:10

    Bridges are so pretty to photography! So nice there.

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  5. Susan Kane April 13, 2015 / 17:14

    I used “gallus” or a variation in a post about “eedjits”. Now I know what it means. thank you.
    Over from the A to Z.

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    • Anabel Marsh April 13, 2015 / 17:17

      It’s a pure dead brilliant word, so it is!
      (You have to ay all that in a Glasgow accent for it to work though.)

      Like

  6. Liz Young April 13, 2015 / 19:01

    To my shame and dismay I have never been to Scotland. It’s on my bucket list, though, as my OH is half Scots.

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  7. Birgit April 13, 2015 / 21:06

    Great pics and still trying to understand the sex from coal

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  8. Heyjude April 13, 2015 / 22:27

    Sounds like the accent is similar to Seth Efriken or even New Zealand 😀
    Loving this series.

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  9. Arpitaz Thoughts April 13, 2015 / 22:33

    Interesting and beautiful. Someday, I amy just visit Glasgow, and maybe you. You never know. 🙂

    Like

    • Anabel Marsh April 14, 2015 / 07:59

      I used to love Victor and Barry! Nice to give them a wee revival.

      Like

  10. Maria Kristina Maano April 14, 2015 / 04:44

    One thing I loved about visiting England and Scotland is that both are home to many scientists. They are inspirations to my profession. 🙂

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    • Anabel Marsh April 14, 2015 / 08:05

      And Glasgow University can celebrate many more eg James Watt.

      Like

  11. Alex Hurst April 15, 2015 / 01:56

    I love, love, love old bridges like that. They were really popular in the Meiji Period in Japan, so a lot of them still exist near palaces and castles around the country. And that statue of Lord Kelvin makes him look like a samurai to boot!

    Like

    • Anabel Marsh April 15, 2015 / 07:46

      Now I have a completely different way of looking at him!

      Like

  12. Celine Jeanjean April 15, 2015 / 03:32

    Haha, I liked the jokes on the accent. I really struggle with the Glaswegian accent, maybe it’s because I’m french, but even after spending quite a bit of time with a friend who’s from Glasgow, I often have to ask him to repeat himself several times. If he’s just come back from a trip home, forget about it. I can’t carry on a conversation with him unless he purposefully softens his accent. I do love listening to the various Scottish accents though, I think they sounds great!

    Like

    • Anabel Marsh April 15, 2015 / 07:52

      I’m English originally, and I had trouble when we first arrived – to the extent that I didn’t realise till my friend told me that a taxi driver was telling dirty jokes and I was smiling politely! Once your ear adjusts it’s fine.

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      • Celine Jeanjean April 15, 2015 / 12:39

        Haha, they must have found it hilarious! Have you picked up the accent then?

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        • Anabel Marsh April 15, 2015 / 13:24

          Yes I have! Most people now think I am Scottish, and I feel I am too after all this time.

          >

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  13. dormousetidings April 16, 2015 / 06:20

    Haha! Awesome! I followed the link to the video; loved it! I will be bopping away for the reminder of the day to the tune, “Kelvinside Men!”

    Like

  14. Sue Archer April 19, 2015 / 00:50

    That’s a lot of Kelvins! Sounds like it would be easy to get lost. 🙂

    Like

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