A stroll in the grounds of Scone Palace

Scone Palace
Scone Palace

We had a couple of weekends in Perth in 2016. Both times we visited Scone Palace (and however you pronounce the thing that you eat, this Scone is definitely Scoon). The first visit was in so-called flaming June when it poured. We toured the house (no photography) and had a quick look at the Chapel on Moot Hill, crowning place of the Kings of Scots and home to the Stone of Scone aka the Stone of Destiny, before taking refuge back in the car.

As we knew there was far more than this to the grounds, we were determined to go back for a proper stroll. Fortunately, our visit in December, although very cold, was dry and we enjoyed a couple of hours there.

We started again at the palace, where we were intrigued by the white peacock which I thought might have been an albino. However, according to Wikipedia, although albino peafowl do exist, they are quite rare and almost all white peafowl have a different condition called leucism. An albino peacock will have red or pink eyes whereas one with leucism will have normal eye-colour – which I think you can clearly see here (if you click to enlarge the photo).

We followed the path round Moot Hill to the site of an old tomb and then the David Douglas Pavilion at the edge of the Pinetum. David Douglas was born in Scone in 1799 and worked as a gardener at the palace for seven years. He went on to become an explorer and a great plant hunter.

The highlight of the grounds for me was the Murray Star Maze with its copper beech hedges and water nymph in the centre. The pattern is designed to resemble the owner’s family tartan, Ancient Murray of Tullibardine, and is in the shape of a five-pointed star which is part of the family’s emblem. The shortest way to its centre is only about 30 metres although there are over 800 metres of paths altogether. We walked something in between those distances!

The village of Scone once stood within the grounds of the Palace. However, when the medieval house was rebuilt in 1803 and the new Palace grounds were landscaped in 1805 the entire village was relocated two miles away and became known as ‘New Scone’. Aren’t aristocrats lovely?

There are still many reminders of old Scone around the grounds. The Ancient Burial Ground of Scone, above, is one. The Mercat Cross and 16th century archway which was the grand entrance to the ‘City of Scone’, below, are others. Some of the stonework has been nicely restored here.

Finally we paid our respects to the Highland Cattle, one of which had rather an alarming glint in its eye. Fortunately, they were safely behind a robust fence.

I hope you’ve enjoyed your stroll round Scone Place’s grounds. I’m linking it to Jo’s Monday Walks which this week has gorgeous blue Portuguese skies to cheer you up.

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84 thoughts on “A stroll in the grounds of Scone Palace

  1. corinnevail January 24, 2017 / 15:03

    White peacocks and shaggy cows…my favorites!

    Like

  2. susansperspective January 24, 2017 / 01:04

    What a lovely post you have here….and stunning photographs too. Thank you for sharing with me a place I will never be able to afford to visit in person. I love to see places all over the world and with descriptions and photographs such as these I feel like I was there with you. =)

    Like

  3. Glennie January 23, 2017 / 10:34

    The maze looks spectacular. Best wishes for Burns’ Night. I already have my Royal Stewart shawl out of the mothballs.

    Like

    • Anabel Marsh January 23, 2017 / 12:01

      Thanks! We are off to celebrate with friends at a local pub on Wednesday.

      Like

  4. anotherday2paradise January 22, 2017 / 02:45

    What a lovely place, Anabel. I love the Copper Beech maze. It’s really unusual. The peacocks are so gorgeous.

    Like

  5. inesephoto January 21, 2017 / 20:08

    Thank you for sharing all these beautiful places. The stonework is amazing, and the Copper beech maze looks beautiful – love this tree. White peacock is gorgeous, and I would probably spend another hour walking behind him 🙂

    Like

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