Dollar Glen

Dollar
Dollar

One of our favourite outings is to the small town of Dollar in Clackmannanshire, from where we walk up Dollar Glen to Castle Campbell. We did this most recently in December 2016. Unfortunately, since the last time we visited, the hotel bar in which we usually ate lunch has closed – the horror! – but we found a more than adequate substitute in the Bridge Street Kitchen – hooray!

Suitably fortified, we made our way past some chain saw carving and up West Burnside.

Just where the footpath to the castle begins there is a small museum in an old mill building. In all our years of visiting Dollar we have never been in – until this time. It’s a fascinating collection of information on local history staffed by friendly volunteers (an extensive chat with one unearthed three mutual acquaintances). I was particularly interested in the section on Lavinia Malcolm, a woman I had never heard of but who was the first woman town councillor (1907) and the first woman Provost (Mayor – 1913) in Scotland. We noted that we must have walked past a plaque on her former home and decided to look out for it on our way back.

After the museum, we climbed up the Glen past this intriguing money mushroom – I’ve seen money trees before but this is a first – to the point where we could look back on the view you can see in the post header. Castle Campbell soon loomed over us.

We had spent so long in the museum that the castle was about to close by the time we got there, so we passed it by and returned down the other side of the glen. The lights had come on by the time we got back to Dollar making it look very festive.

As hoped, we found Lavinia’s house and memorial plaque.

My favourite kind of walk – countryside and history combined! For more walks of all kinds, pop over to Jo’s Monday Walk for a wide choice of topics.

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#ThrowbackThursday: 2007

When I was looking for photographs to illustrate my recent posts on our Canadian Rockies trip of 2007, I came across these pictures from just after we came home. I’d forgotten about turning up to Aberdour Castle and discovering a falconry display was about to happen. I look ever so slightly nervous about that beak!

We also visited Castle Campbell on what seems to have been a lovely early autumn day.

We had a weekend in Newcastle-upon-Tyne so that I could attend a school reunion. The Quayside has improved enormously in the years decades since I was a teenager.

That 3-button cardigan makes me laugh – I wouldn’t mind betting someone reading this owned a similar one. Marks and Spencer sold them for months, though varying the colour-schemes quite regularly. We more or less had to have a cardigan rota at work to avoid wearing them on the same day.

I also saw the Angel of the North close up for the first, and so far only, time. I think it’s really impressive, though I know it’s not to everyone’s taste.

Angel of the North

I’d forgotten the two castle visits – we visit castles all the time – but I remember the reunion very clearly. I’m only in touch with one friend from those days but it was amazing how easy it was to chat to the others, even if I hadn’t seen them since the mid-1970s. I met the teacher in the photograph below too – I wonder if you can find me?

Rutherford 1971

Scottish Snapshots: A quartet of castles

Scottish Snapshots is a series of short posts about places I visited in 2013 but didn’t write about at the time

Scotland is not short of an iconic ruined castle or two. Last autumn, we visited four, all run by Historic Scotland. Since these posts are called Snapshots, I’m going to restrict myself to a photo and a fact about each.

Doune Castle

Doune Castle
Doune Castle
Fact

If you take an audio-tour of the castle, you’ll find it’s narrated by Terry Jones. Monty Python and the Holy Grail was filmed at Doune.

Bothwell Castle

Bothwell Castle
Bothwell Castle
Fact

In 1301, Edward I of England, “Hammer of the Scots”, brought 6,800 soldiers to the castle. A huge siege engine was hauled from Glasgow and the garrison surrendered within the month. Boo!

Dumbarton Castle

Dumbarton Castle
Dumbarton Castle
Fact

This castle is built high above the Clyde on the twin peaks of a volcanic rock. There are a lot of stairs!

Castle Campbell

Castle Campbell
Castle Campbell
Fact

Castle Campbell used to be known as Castle Gloom or Glume. As you can see, it’s not at all gloomy on a bright autumn day – and it’s a lovely walk up the glen from the village of Dollar.